One Direction’s “One Way or Another” hits number one as the fastest selling single of the year.

One Direction are back at number one after their Comic Relief cover of One Way Or Another became the fastest selling single of 2013.

Granted it’s only February, but it’s for charity so WHEY for them.

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Having only performed the track for the first time at the BRITs on Wednesday, 1D have already racked up an impressive 113.000 copies sold since it’s release last Sunday.

One Direction decided that rather than waste money on a commercially produced video they would film it themselves using footage whilst touring so that more money goes to Comic Relief.

Watch the video here

Buy now on itunes and support Comic Relief
https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/one-way-or-another-teenage/id593902718

Jo’s 40th Birthday – Kingsthorpe Golf Club – Feb 2013

Our new package 1 colour themed setup in action at Jo’s 40th Birthday, Kingsthorpe Golf Club, Northampton

Crowd surfing birthday
Guests enjoying themselves
Guests enjoying themselves
Guests enjoying themselves
Guests enjoying themselves
Guests enjoying themselves
Kingsthorpe Golf Club
Package 1 colour themed setup - new for 2013
View from the DJ booth
Guests arrival
Guests arrival
Crowd surfing birthday
Guests enjoying themselves
Guests enjoying themselves
Guests enjoying themselves
Guests enjoying themselves
Guests enjoying themselves
Kingsthorpe Golf Club
Package 1 colour themed setup - new for 2013
View from the DJ booth
Guests arrival
Guests arrival
Crowd surfing birthday

New for 2013 – Colour themed disco setup at Kingshorpe Golf Club, Northampton – 40th Birthday

New for 2013. Tonight’s colour themed small setup for a 40th birthday at Kingsthorpe Golf Club, Northampton.
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This  setup is ideal for smaller parties and weddings, adding a stunning full colour themed booth and speaker scrims which can be matched to wedding colours. Supplied with sound system and room filling lighting.

If you would like to book this setup please contact us using the link above.

Choose your wedding entertainment wisely

Choosing wedding entertainment on price alone can be risky. We pride ourselves in providing very high quality setups to complement your chosen venue and theme along with the experience to ensure your special day is not ruined by equipment breakdown or an unreliable or inexperienced DJ. A wedding reception party is like no other party and is a one-off, never to be repeated event.

Brides spend a great deal of time, choosing the correct venue, choosing a beautiful dress and making sure the whole daytime reception is perfect. It’s sad to say but often the same attention to detail for the evening reception is overlooked and can be just as big a part of the day for evening guests. The evening reception often represents 50% of your wedding day. An inexperienced DJ may cause your evening reception to be remembered for all the wrong reasons.

We often hear from brides and grooms that have been let down at the last minute by cheap DJ’s who have failed to turn up or called to cancel days before (often because they have been offered a slightly better paid function). Please do not let the evening reception run the risk of being spoiled. Choosing a professional wedding DJ need not be expensive and the rewards can be priceless

We understand that above all other types of party a wedding reception is DIFFERENT, and are able to use our experience to ensure your reception is truly unique, fun and memorable.

Please ask for a copy of our wedding brochure.
Contact us

A very interesting read for brides to be

Some things Brides and DJs need to know about UK Hotel wedding packages.

In this economic climate I can understand why hotels are keen to offer “Wedding Package Deals” to their customers. It is a very competitive market and business is tough. Brides are conscious of keeping their budget under control and value for money is an important part of the process when hiring service providers.

However cutting costs too far can be a false economy especially when slashing budgets may well mean poor quality and indifferent service. Saving money on products can be a good idea especially if the consequence is negligible. Choosing a Chicken dinner instead of Beef or a less expensive Cava instead of Champagne will save money but will not detract from the overall enjoyment of the event.  Services however are a whole different ball game.

Cutting costs on services can seriously impact on the guest’s enjoyment. When a hotel claims they can provide certain services usually associated with other professions please be very careful for all may not be as it seems. The hotel “Wedding Planner” or “coordinator” may well believe that such services are a great reason for clients to take the package but in my experience, and many of my colleagues, what is provided is often below parr.  All too often they result in a bland, stereotypical production line wedding reception no different from the one the day before. Where is the personalisation, how unique will the service be and who is guaranteeing the enjoyment of the guests?

“Our Duty Manager as your Master of Ceremonies”

How experienced is this member of staff. Does the bride have the opportunity to see an example of his work. Very often the hotel won’t even know who this individual will be until nearer the date. Staff members come and go, and rotas are not prepared much more than a few days before an event. Do brides really want to take a gamble when it comes to being introduced into the room and announcements made for toasts and speeches. Is it acceptable for Mr and Mrs Jones to not be referred to by their first names and does the father of the bride wish to be called Jack instead of John or is he to be announced as Mr Smith?

You DJ is included in the price.

This is scary. How can a hotel use the same DJ day in day out and guarantee that their DJ can provide a unique, fun and memorable entertainment experience for everyone. Maybe they can. Maybe the DJ will agree to meet with the bride ahead of the date and will work with her to create something special. However I doubt it.

In my experience in the majority of instances the in-house DJ supplied by the hotel will not be available to meet with the bride. This DJ is probably, but not always, supplied by an agency or is part of a group of DJs who work for the Hotel. Remember this, the DJ is working for the Hotel and not for the bride. The hotel has its own criteria for using this type of DJ. Generally speaking a hotel is terrified of a failure for a DJ to turn up so they insist on using a DJ service that can cover sickness, accident and unexpected events at short notice. The hotels just want an average dependable DJ and surprisingly they expect to get such a DJ for very little money. Worse still, many hotels actually make money by offering this kind of package. You can be assured the DJ does not receive the fee mentioned in the advertising.

Who gave them the right?

A wedding reception is a once in a lifetime event. Two families are being united for the first time. Guests are travelling often many miles to share this special occasion. The wedding breakfast and the reception afterwards should be a reflection of the personalities of the bride and her bridegroom and families. Who gave the hotel the right to treat entertainment as a product like a cheap bottle of wine?

You don’t know what you don’t know.

If no one mentions the DIFFERENCE a QUALITY, EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONAL DJ or MC can make to a wedding then the bride will be left in the dark completely unaware that there is a better alternative. I heard the other day of a venue who wanted an independent DJ to be their wedding package DJ after he did a great job at the hotel’s Christmas part season. He was happy to oblige but was disappointed when the hotel only offered to pay him less than half his usual fee per wedding. It turned out that their usual wedding DJ was, in the words of the hotel, “crap” and they wouldn’t dream of using him for an event held in their name. Yet they are happy to have him “entertain” at a wedding reception!

Do you really want to end up with a MacWedding?

There is a better way. There are DJs & MCs out there who are specialists in wedding entertainment. They will want to meet brides and help plan the party. Many will have lots of ideas as to how to introduce special “Spotlight Moments” into the proceedings where all of the guests can be part of the celebration.  My advice is to seek these specialist wedding DJs out and do the research. Insist on meeting a “house” or “resident” DJ and ask them exactly how they intend to entertain your family and guests?

Level playing field.

Not all resident DJs are as previously described. There are some very good resident DJs who do offer a personalised service. They will meet with brides and they will work with them to help create something special and memorable. Sadly they are few and far between and are difficult to find. They will price their service according to the time taken to plan, prepare and customise their performance. They will not be cheap. They will represent good value for money and will be backed by testimonials from satisfied clients.

The same is true of venues. Some venues are very customer focused and appreciate the value of professional services. These venues will offer a choice of service provider and will encourage clients to meet and talk through with them their requirements. A venue which recommends clients select their service providers [all be it from a preferred list] and is prepared to work alongside them is a much better option in my opinion.

Why?

When a venue starts trying to tell brides they must have a particular DJ they need to ask  why. The venue will mention things like insurance, back up, reliability. These are red herrings. A good local Independent Wedding DJ or “Specialist Agent” can match all of these “reasons” and deliver much more. Think about this? Venues don’t say brides must use this Band for live music so why are they being allowed to say which DJ should be used?

Unfortunately there are more DJs out there than brides. Many DJ’s treat a wedding like any other party. In their eyes the reception is no different from a birthday party. They believe it’s all about the music and that whatever was played last night will be more or less the same tonight with one or two requests thrown in. Nothing could be further from the truth.

A wedding reception brings together people of all ages with a huge difference in musical taste. The specialist wedding DJ needs to cater for everyone in the room and focus on the bride and groom’s personal preferences in a way in which they are represented and presented to their guests. The specialist wedding DJ knows that the reception requires more than just great music to interact and entertain all of the guests.

It’s not WHAT a DJ does it’s HOW he does it which gets results.

How are a bride and groom going to be announced into the room?

How will the cake cutting be announced?

How will the first dance be staged, directed and produced?

How will the party finish, with a bang or a whimper?

What will the guests remember weeks, months and years after the event?

Is it worth the risk, the gamble, of hiring a cheap unknown DJ for the most important day of a bride’s life?

Please do the research, don’t accept anything a venue says without checking out the details and do please seek out a professional Wedding DJ and ask the right questions.

Beware of the phrase, “we always do it this way”

Save money

Engaging a DJ / MC directly can often save money too. Very few are VAT registered where as every venue will add VAT to the bill. The extra 20 percent could go a long way to helping make the day “perfect”

Congratulations, good luck and best wishes.

Author: derekpen
Wedding Marketing for mobile DJs

Testing out a new setup last night.

Trying out a different setup last night. Corporate black tie dinner dance.

The setup was based on our small colour themed setup with a larger sound system and some additional lighting. The room was colour themed with red up lighters and DJ booth and lighting was matched during the meal.

Sorry for the poor quality photos as I only had my phone with me. A very good night with non stop dancing from start to finish.

 

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Wedding Rings: Diamond & Wedding Band Traditions

weddingrings

Ahhh, the romance of the ring. But how did it become a marriage symbol, and why is the fourth finger of your left hand the lucky recipient? Here are the history, traditions, and purported powers of engagement and wedding rings.

Ring Romance

It is believed the Pharaohs of Egypt first used the circle, a shape with no beginning or end, as a symbol of eternity, but wearing a ring as a public pledge to honor the marriage contract did not become customary until Roman times. The earliest rings were made of simple iron, but gold rings set with gems were fashionable by medieval days. The most popular gems were symbolic — a red ruby was the color of the heart, a blue sapphire reflected the heavens — but the most coveted and powerful gem was the indestructible diamond.

Diamond Daze

The word “diamond” is derived from the Greek word adamas, which means “the unconquerable.” As Mother Nature’s hardest substance, diamonds represented invincible strength, a fitting gem for the marriage covenant. But the real pull of these sparkly stones — which ancient Greeks believed were delicate splinters of fallen stars — came from the powers and protection they offered the wearer. In India, where diamonds were first discovered, they were thought to be a shield from the combined forces of evil (which at that time included snakes, poison, and theft). Ancient astrologers believed diamonds promoted lasting love and warded off witchcraft and nightmares. Associated with everything from innocence to sexual power to all-encompassing protection, you can see why the diamond became the betrothal gift of choice for lads and ladies.

The Engagement Rage

Blame it on Archduke Maximilian of Austria, who started the diamond ring trend in 1477 when he presented one to his beloved, Mary of Burgundy. The tradition of wearing the engagement ring and wedding band on the fourth finger of the left hand can be traced to the Egyptians, who believed the vena amoris (vein of love) ran directly from the heart to the top of this finger.

Manly Bands

Dual-ring ceremonies, in which both bride and groom wear a ring, were introduced by the Greek Orthodox Church in the 1300s. The custom didn’t catch on in America until the beginning of World War II, when young men were forced to leave their beloveds behind, not knowing when and if they would return. Many couples married in anticipation of separation, and wedding bands — one for each partner — were considered critical to the war effort, as a solace to lonely soldiers and as a reminder for brides that their faraway soldier thought of them always. By the height of the war, 85% of marriages were dual-ring ceremonies. And of course, they continue to be today — and we’re more attached to our wedding bling than ever before.

 

— The Knot

Read more: Wedding Rings: Diamond & Wedding Band TraditionsTheKnot.com – http://wedding.theknot.com/wedding-planning/wedding-customs/articles/diamond-wedding-band-traditions.aspx#ixzz2KVucYi8J

Receiving Line: Etiquette, Options & Tips

What they say about weddings is true: It’ll all be over before you know it. So then how can you ensure you’ll get the chance to talk to each and every guest before the bell tolls? Enter the receiving line — the most formal and efficient line dance you’ll ever do. Here’s how to connect with your company, and give guests your most heartfelt greetings and gratitude.

Why Have One?

A receiving line is the best opportunity to greet each guest individually and thank him or her for coming to your wedding. And if you’re having more than 50 guests, it’s considered proper etiquette. The line also guarantees your guests a minute of face-to-face time with you, a chance to hug, kiss, and congratulate you both, and to say things like “The ceremony was lovely.” If you rely instead on the more casual greet-them-as-you-see-them approach, you may spend the whole party in a tailspin, ducking out of conversations to say hello to people you haven’t greeted yet, and inevitably you’ll end up missing someone.

When & Where?

Generally the receiving line is formed immediately following the ceremony or at the beginning of the reception. You’ll want to take spatial constraints into consideration when choosing where to line up so that family and bridal party members aren’t standing on top of each other and guests have room to move in a smooth, orderly procession (which in turn makes the line go faster so you can all get on to the party). Proper ventilation is also crucial to avoid sweaty brows and swooning bridesmaids. The most commonly used ceremony site areas include the hallway or vestibule at the head of the aisle, outside the entry doors, down the front steps, or on the front porch. At your reception site the options are many, depending on the party space: consider the cocktail lounge, the lobby, just outside the doors leading into the main room, or the reception room itself, perhaps on the dance floor. Ultimately, pick a spot where you and your guests can stand comfortably for the duration.

Who Stands in it?

Traditionally, the bride’s parents — as hosts — head the receiving line and are first to greet guests, followed by the bride and groom and then the groom’s parents. Many lines we’ve seen also include the entire bridal party (if there’s room), and sometimes even grandparents (if they’re able). Today, however, with more couples contributing to or paying for their own weddings, the lines have blurred (so to speak). The couple may wish to stand alone, especially if the majority of guests are their friends, or they may stand with just the moms while the dads circulate among and welcome the crowd during the cocktail hour.

Divorced & Remarried Parents

This may be one of the stickier situations you’ll encounter when orchestrating the big day, and the resolution often depends on the relationships between the relevant parties. If your parents are divorced, they should not stand next to one another in line — even if they are sharing hosting duties — as this gives the impression that they are still a couple. Instead, place Mom on one side of you and the groom, then the groom’s parents, then Dad. If this arrangement doesn’t sit well, consider placing another family member or an honor attendant between them. And what about stepparents? Should you include them too? That depends: Do you have a good relationship with them? Is your mom/dad capable of sharing this duty with your stepmom/dad with civility and grace? You should strive to make everyone feel as comfortable as possible. If this arrangement gets the green light, simply have your father stand with his new wife, and your mother with her new husband. This way guests will understand the relationships.

Introductions All Around

The receiving line is where your hosting duties as the bride and groom kick off. It’ll no doubt be a whirlwind of faces, but as much as possible you should introduce your new spouse and your parents to all the guests they have not yet met. First names and the guests’ relationships to you should suffice. Likewise all guests should take it upon themselves to offer this same information as introduction to attendants and family members whom they’ve never met as they proceed down the line; simply shake hands, offer congratulations, and keep moving. The bride and groom need only accept everyone’s hugs, kisses, and best wishes, and thank them for coming. It’s that simple. And yes, you’ll end up with a lot of lipstick on your cheeks, but fear not — you’re allowed to make a bathroom pit stop before heading to the party.

Variations on a Theme

As is common nowadays, traditions such as the receiving line are ultimately open to interpretation. Depending on the size of your guest list, you may opt to greet guests in other ways. One couple we know personally dismissed guests from their seats right after the ceremony, one row at a time (although we wouldn’t recommend this for gatherings of more than 150 people, or if guests have to remain seated — and suffer — through hot sun, rain, strong winds, or other inclement conditions). If you have fewer than 50 guests, you might decide to turn cocktail hour into the meet-and-greet opportunity instead of a formal receiving line. Whatever you choose, the basic tenets still apply: Greet each of your guests in turn and thank them for joining you on this joyful occasion.

— The Knot http://m.theknot.com

Wedding Traditions & Superstitions: 50 Wedding Facts & Trivia

Good Luck and Bad Luck

1. Hey, brides, tuck a sugar cube into your glove — according to Greek culture, the sugar will sweeten your union.

2. The English believe a spider found in a wedding dress means good luck. Yikes!

3. In English tradition, Wednesday is considered the “best day” to marry, although Monday is for wealth and Tuesday is for health.

4. The groom carries the bride across the threshold to bravely protect her from evil spirits lurking below.

5. Saturday is the unluckiest wedding day, according to English folklore. Funny — it’s the most popular day of the week to marry!

6. Ancient Romans studied pig entrails to determine the luckiest time to marry.

7. Rain on your wedding day is actually considered good luck, according to Hindu tradition!

8. For good luck, Egyptian women pinch the bride on her wedding day. Ouch!

9. Middle Eastern brides paint henna on their hands and feet to protect themselves from the evil eye.

10. Peas are thrown at Czech newlyweds instead of rice.

11. A Swedish bride puts a silver coin from her father and a gold coin from her mother in each shoe to ensure that she’ll never do without.

12. A Finnish bride traditionally went door-to-door collecting gifts in a pillowcase, accompanied by an older married man who represented long marriage.

13. Moroccan women take a milk bath to purify themselves before their wedding ceremony.

14. In Holland, a pine tree is planted outside the newlyweds’ home as a symbol of fertility and luck.

 

It’s Got a Ring To It

15. Engagement and wedding rings are worn on the fourth finger of the left hand because it was once thought that a vein in that finger led directly to the heart.

16. About 70% of all brides sport the traditional diamond on the fourth finger of their left hand.

17. Priscilla Presley’s engagement ring was a whopping 3 1/2-carat rock surrounded by a detachable row of smaller diamonds.

18. Diamonds set in gold or silver became popular as betrothal rings among wealthy Venetians toward the end of the fifteenth century.

19. In the symbolic language of jewels, a sapphire in a wedding ring means marital happiness.

20. A pearl engagement ring is said to be bad luck because its shape echoes that of a tear.

21. One of history’s earliest engagement rings was given to Princess Mary, daughter of Henry VIII. She was two years old at the time.

22. Seventeen tons of gold are made into wedding rings each year in the United States alone!

23. Snake rings dotted with ruby eyes were popular wedding bands in Victorian England — the coils winding into a circle symbolized eternity.

24. Aquamarine represents marital harmony and is said to ensure a long, happy marriage.

 

Fashionable Lore

25. Queen Victoria started the Western world’s white wedding dress trend in 1840 — before then, brides simply wore their best dress.

26. In Asia, wearing robes with embroidered cranes symbolizes fidelity for the length of a marriage.

27. Ancient Greeks and Romans thought the veil protected the bride from evil spirits. Brides have worn veils ever since.

28. On her wedding day, Grace Kelly wore a dress with a bodice made from beautiful 125-year-old lace.

29. Of course, Jackie Kennedy’s bridesmaids were far from frumpy. She chose pink silk faille and red satin gowns created by African-American designer Ann Lowe (also the creator of Jackie’s dress).

30. In Japan, white was always the color of choice for bridal ensembles — long before Queen Victoria popularized it in the Western world.

31. Most expensive wedding ever? The marriage of Sheik Rashid Bin Saeed Al Maktoum’s son to Princess Salama in Dubai in May 1981. The price tag? $44 million.

32. In Korea, brides don bright hues of red and yellow to take their vows.

33. Brides carry or wear “something old” on their wedding day to symbolize continuity with the past.

34. In Denmark, brides and grooms traditionally cross-dressed to confuse evil spirits!

35. The “something blue” in a bridal ensemble symbolizes purity, fidelity, and love.

 

Food and Family

36. In Egypt, the bride’s family traditionally does all the cooking for a week after the wedding, so the couple can…relax.

37. In South Africa, the parents of both bride and groom traditionally carried fire from their hearths to light a new fire in the newlyweds’ hearth.

38. The tradition of a wedding cake comes from ancient Rome, where revelers broke a loaf of bread over a bride’s head for fertility’s sake.

39. The custom of tiered cakes emerged from a game where the bride and groom attempted to kiss over an ever-higher cake without knocking it over.

40. Queen Victoria’s wedding cake weighed a whopping 300 pounds.

41. Legend says single women will dream of their future husbands if they sleep with a slice of groom’s cake under their pillows.

42. An old wives’ tale: If the younger of two sisters marries first, the older sister must dance barefoot at the wedding or risk never landing a husband.

 

Show Off at a Cocktail Party

43. In many cultures around the world — including Celtic, Hindu and Egyptian weddings — the hands of a bride and groom are literally tied together to demonstrate the couple’s commitment to each other and their new bond as a married couple (giving us the popular phrase “tying the knot”).

44. The Roman goddess Juno rules over marriage, the hearth, and childbirth, hence the popularity of June weddings.

45. Princess Victoria established the tradition of playing Wagner’s “Bridal Chorus” during her wedding processional in 1858.

46. The bride stands to the groom’s left during a Christian ceremony, because in bygone days the groom needed his right hand free to fight off other suitors.

47. On average, 7,000 couples marry each day in the United States.

48. Valentine’s Day and New Year’s Eve are the two busiest “marriage” days in Las Vegas — elopement central!

49. The Catholic tradition of “posting the banns” to announce a marriage originated as a way to ensure the bride and groom were not related.

50. Stag parties were first held by ancient Spartan soldiers, who kissed their bachelor days goodbye with a raucous party.